03Oct/16

Can’t sleep? Adjust the temperature.

If insomnia is a problem, maybe your bedroom is too hot or too cold. Both can affect sleep in surprising ways.  Are you keeping your room too cool for comfort because your home costs a fortune to heat? Don’t lose sleep to save money! Contact us to find out how you can make your home more energy and cost-efficient.

sleeping-baby

How Air Temperature Affects Your Sleep

Experts agree the temperature of your sleeping area and how comfortable you feel in it affect how well and how long you snooze. Why? “When you go to sleep, your set point for body temperature — the temperature your brain is trying to achieve — goes down.” “Think of it as the internal thermostat.” If it’s too cold or too hot, the body struggles to achieve this set point. That mild drop in body temperature induces sleep. Generally, Heller says,“if you are in a cooler [rather than too-warm] room, it is easier for that to happen.” But if the room becomes uncomfortably hot or cold, you are more likely to wake up. He explains that the comfort level of your bedroom temperature also especially affects the quality of REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, the stage in which you dream.

What’s the Best Temperature for Sleeping?

Recommending a specific range is difficult because what is comfortable for one person isn’t for another. While a typical recommendation is to keep the room between 65 and 72 degrees Fahrenheit, Heller advises setting the temperature at a comfortable level, whatever that means to the sleeper. There are other strategies for creating ideal sleeping conditions, too. Experts from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, for instance, advise thinking of a bedroom as a cave: It should cool, quiet, and dark. (Bats follow this logic and are champion sleepers, getting in 16 hours a day.) Be wary of memory foam pillows, which feel good because they conform closely to your body shape — but may make you too hot. And put socks on your feet, as cold feet, in particular, can be very disruptive to sleep.

23Sep/16

Hurricane Season is Upon us!

Although the Hurricane Season in New England is defined as June 1st to November 30th, 75% of the 40 tropical systems that have impacted our region in the past century have struck during the months of August and September. The last severe hurricane to hit Massachusetts was Hurricane Bob in August 1991. Bob, a Category 2 Hurricane, with winds between 91 and 110mph, caused almost $1 billion in damage, at the time. More recently, Hurricanes Eduardo (1996), Bonnie (1998) and Bill (2009) threatened the Bay State, but veered out into the Atlantic as they traveled up the coast (www.mass.gov).

hurricane-roof-damage

Every year, as storm season rolls around, millions fear for the safety of their family as well as the safety of their home. Now, with Demilec USA’s Heatlok XT spray foam insulation, you can rest assured that your home is protected by the strength of a hurricane adhesive, tested to have bonding strengths up to 2 times that of Florida’s code minimum! Heatlok XT can provide the following benefits to your home:

  • Reduce Storm Damage
  • Increases Wind Uplift Resistance
  • Create a More Solid Structure

Demilec USA’s Heatlok XT Spray Foam and Hurricane Adhesive product bonds the roof deck and trusses together, meeting and exceeding the requirements of the state of Florida, a state known for its destructive hurricanes (www.demilec.com). You worked hard to put the roof over your family’s head. Don’t let a storm carry it away! Give us a call and ask how you can get Heatlok XT in your home today!

27May/16

Invest in insulation!

invest in foamOne question that we always get asked here at The Green Cocoon is, “What is the R.O.I. on insulation?”  Consumers want to know if the upfront cost is worth it and more importantly, how long the payback will take. Let’s break this down and find out! Although energy costs vary per state, the average winter heating bill for oil and propane users is about $3,600.00 per year in New England (www.mass.gov/eea/energy-utilities…/household-heating-costs.html).  The average monthly electric bill is around $94.00 (http://www.electricitylocal.com/states/massachusetts/), and much higher in the summer months due to the use of air conditioners.  That comes to a moderate total of $4,720.00 annually.  Some of our customers have seen reductions in their heating and cooling bills of upwards of 75%, but for the sake of this example, let’s just say that by insulating your home you save 25%.  That is a savings of $1,182.00 per year!  If the average insulation job for medium sized homes is around $6,000 (give or take a few thousand depending on size and material), it would take about 5 years to get the return on your investment.  After that, you are pocketing an extra $1,182.00 per year.  Think of all of the things you could do with that money! What does that money equal?  Here’s what you can do with $1,182.00:

1) You can buy 2 months worth of groceries for a family of 4.

2) You could take a one week cruise to the Bahamas every year.

3) Fill the gas tank in your car for 6 months!

4) Invest it every year and after 30 years you would have over $84,000!

As you can see, insulation is well worth the investment. The question should not be “Can I afford it?”  The question is, “How can you not?”

Don’t have the money upfront for insulation? Don’t wait to start saving. Ask us about our interest free financing options!

 

24May/16

Visions of the Future

We here at the Green Cocoon are always striving to be the best we can be, inside and outside of the company.  We truly believe that we are only as great as our weakest link and that is why we are constantly striving to empower and inspire our team members to not only be great employees, but great people.  We decided to have everyone participate in a team building exercise with our good friends at UROCK Marketing.  Each one of us made a vision board and filled it with our dreams, aspirations and inspiration.  We hope that by having a visual path to their goals our employees will be successful in every aspect of their lives!  Watch our short video below of the event.  To find our more about UROCK’s team building and vision board parties, check out their website- www.urockmarketing.com

04May/16

Remembering Our First Passive House

We here at the Green Cocoon have a passion for efficiency, not only in our daily operations but also in the projects that we choose to work on. We have been fortunate enough to work on everything from small renovations and existing attics to energy positive, net-zero and our favorite, the Passive House. What is a passive house, you ask? The term passive house (Passivhaus in German) refers to a rigorous, voluntary standard for energy efficiency in a building, reducing its ecological footprint. A continuous, balanced supply of fresh air ensures unparalleled indoor air quality. Operable windows connect indoors with out. Super-insulated walls hold warmth in the winter and cool in the summer. Special windows and a building envelope consisting of a highly insulated roof and floor slab as well as highly insulated exterior walls keep the desired warmth in the house – or undesirable heat out. It results in ultra-low energy buildings that require little energy for space heating or cooling.

Dan ROy passive house
Currently in the U.S. there are less than 100 certified passive houses in existence, and we have worked on 4 of them. In the fall we will be starting another passive house in Rhode Island. We like to think of ourselves as the “go-to insulation company” for highly energy efficient projects.
To learn more about this project and passive house building in general, click here.

28Jan/16

Our Foam in Now Even Greener!

 

When it comes to reducing our carbon footprint and making our homes more efficient, the phrase “The more insulation the better” is often used.  While all insulation materials reduce greenhouse gas emissions (by saving energy and reducing our use of fossil fuels), insulating with thick layers of spray foams often results in long “payback periods” for the global warming potential of the insulation, mainly due to the most commonly used blowing agents. Continue reading